Thursday, October 17, 2013

More inexplicably urgent traffic proposals from the 50s

As it is now
  The city desperately needed four new elevated overpasses in May 1959 or else the head of Traffic Director Jean Lacoste might have exploded.
   The fancy, curvy thing pictured above was proposed for the what's now known as Jean Talon and Winter Coat (Cote des Neiges), although it was then described as Namur, which no longer goes anywhere near Cote des Neiges.
  The four "grade separations" as they were called, would have cost the city $9.5 million.
  The other three supposedly-required structures were at St. James and St. Remy, Bridge and Wellington and a last one at Cote des Neige and McGregor, see link above for illustration on that one.
   

5 comments:

Blork said...

Back in the day, Jean-Talon *was* Namur, as you can see in this map from 1945:

http://services.banq.qc.ca/sdx/cep/pleinecran.xsp?eview=CARTES_PLANS/65557/65557_01.tif&id=0000065557&mention=

電波の世界 said...

Jeeeeze, the one at Guy/Atwater was much scarier!!! This would have torn down all these beautiful houses in front of the MGH...

Unknown said...

The "Namur Coffee Rendez-vous" was near G.H. Wood, "Sanitation for the Nation"...still there as a car dealer, the rounded window with the 1950s type glass having been the office of local Sales Manager Ralph Sowerby...

Greg P said...

I still think the metropolitan expressway was a complete disaster from the start. Rather than focusing on ring roads around the city, as american cities were doing at the time. Planners in Montreal decided to run major highways through the city thus creating the situation we find ourselves in today..

UrbanLegend said...

A "Metropolitan" expressway along its current route was proposed as far back as 1929, but its design was modified until it finally opened around late 1960. An alternate plan was to build it as a Decarie-type "depressway" rather than elevated.

The existing Metroplitain Blvd. was already considered part of the proposed Trans Canada Highway which would veer off at an angle from Cote de Liesse near Alexis Nihon Blvd. through the West Island and eventually opening to traffic approximately 1965.

See Montreal Gazette, July 14. 1956, page 25 article with map.

Calgary Herald, Sept. 19, 1957, page 65, including a photo of the proposed Pine-Park Interchange (recently demolished).

Montreal Gazette, Oct. 28, 1960, page 1 with map.