Sunday, March 14, 2010

Quiz - where is this exactly?

It is indeed Griffintown 1896, shot by Notman from a tall building downtown. The main street there is Mountain, of course. Thanks to Rich who also provided a link to an amazing panorama that shows even more.

13 comments:

Rich said...

A classic panorama from 1896,

I believe the Street Railway Powerhouse was on the north side of William just west of Mountain.

Rich said...

Pictures of the powerhouse from 1894, courtesy of Notman and McCord.

cool michael "the situation" @ nj shore 1999 said...

My guess is de la montagne and du seminaire looking towards the Vic Bri, but I bet you know EXACTLY where this was taken from!

emdx said...

Street on the right: Mountain street.

Street emerging from the first bottom ⅓ of the picture, Séminaire street (current name).

Cross street: Ottawa.

This is (of course) in Griffintown. One can see the old Wellington street swin bridge right next to the turning basin.

Given how the Victoria bridge is still tubular and how far it’s embankment goes into the river and the state of the Mackay jetty, I would date the picture between 1870 and 1892.

By the angle of the picture, I would surmise that it was taken from the top of a smokestack located on the southwest corner of Mountain and William.

Seth said...

On top of the Farine 5 Roses Flour sign? It's amazing to see those locks actually being used. Great pic wherever it was taken.

Christian said...

De La Montagne street in Griffintown. I believe the park which is now taking the place of the block and the church is called St-Ann's. I don't remember the name of the street on the right. I used to live in one of those houses in the left of the pictures in front of the park, they are still standing today. Good times, but I felt I was living in a ghost town.

Brother Wine said...

great picture

Kristian said...

About those houses on Mountain: my friend Jean Louis - who I think reads this site - lived in that tiny cottage with low ceilings. No point in trying to go upstairs if you were over 5 foot 3 or so. I have an article somewhere here where Frank Hanley thanks some local industrial guy for saving that row of buildings rather than demolishing them. He gave them a big wooden key to the city. This is around 69.

Rich said...

I've uploaded the pano here if anyone would like a copy (1.3 MB jpg). The link's good for one week.

It breaks my heart a bit to see how many beautiful buildings we've lost over the years.

Griff said...

Of course that part of Mountain St. in those days was called McCord St. It kept its name until nationalism became fashionable and the name became de la Montagne.

Rich said...

Here's one sexy-ass 6 MB aerial photo of Griffintown from 1950-ish. Temporary link, as usual. You can see the honkin' big chimney from which the pano was taken just left of the center of the image.

Rich said...

I spotted a new book on Griffintown at Indigo this evening: An Irish Heart by Sharon Doyle Driedger. If the last couple of chapters are any indication it's a worthy read.

Anonymous said...

Not sure how to get this to you directly, but did you know that Google now has archives of The Gazette and The Guardian in a scanned and searchable format? The Guardian covered news for the Point, Verdun, and Cote St. Paul. Check out The Guardian out here:

http://news.google.ca/newspapers?nid=pRWBApOjXDcC&dat=19331215&b_mode=2